Moser

History

This barn was built in 1968, after a fire destroyed the original barn on the property on September 18th, 1967. It is the smallest barn in this database and was built using more modern methods. The arched ribbed roof and high-grade concrete foundation are some of the last innovations in barn building.

Norbert (Norb) and Esther Moser were married November 23, 1942 and bought the property this barn sits on in 1943. Esther Moser kept a diary, which she wrote in everyday. She recorded the fire that destroyed the family’s original barn and the delivery of parts for the new barn. Photos of these entries can be seen at the bottom of this page.

It is believed that this barn was built by the Taralson family as they had a building business in Killam at the time. The barn was built using frame construction and balloon framing. The arched ribs for the roof of the barn run from the foundation to the peak. The current barn on the property has only been used to store square bales because it was built after the loose-hay era. The current barn does not have a hay track, hay carrier, or hay hood.

Norb and Esther always had cattle while they lived on this property. They used their barns for cattle and 4-H calves. Additionally, they also had riding horses that they would sometimes keep or saddle within the barn. In 1972, Norb and Esther moved into Killam and their son, Jack, moved to this property.

In June of 1977 Jack Moser married Sharon Graham. The pair raised their four boys on the family farm; Jamie, Christopher, Adam, and Justin. Throughout the years, Jack and Sharon have used the current barn on their property for horses, calves, baby chicks in the spring, and “Shamrock” – the milk cow.  Many a barn cat have made the barn their home. As well, the four Moser boys and their friends were often found playing in the loft of the barn.

It is believed that the original barn on this property burnt down due to spontaneous ignition. On September 18th, 1967, the Moser family finished filling the loft of their original barn with fresh hay. It was a hot day and it is believed that the hay in loft got to a high enough temperature that it ignited. Luckily, there were no animals inside the barn at the time. However, the barn and most of its contents could not be saved. Jack Moser remembers running home from the neighbours house to see his father, Norb, trying to save their horses’ tack. Norb was able to save a few items before he was unable to reenter the barn.

Moser, Jack and Sharon. Personal communication. 15 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the eastern side and the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows a close-up of the weather vane on the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern half of the western wall. This frame was taken whilst standing in the doorway on the southern end of the barn. Notice the stands for saddles on the western wall.

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This frame shows the chop bin in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the ladder up into the loft on the southern end of the barn. The doorway in the right aspect of this frame is the door in the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the western door of the barn.

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This frame shows the western wall of the barn. Notice the arched ribs for the barn’s roof in the center of the frame.

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This frame shows the horse stall on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the walkway through the barn as taken from the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the walkway through the barn as taken from the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the horse stall on the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern pen in the northern end of the barn. Notice the cement floor in the pen.

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Both the north-eastern and the north-western pens have angled mangers like this.

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This frame shows the inside of the barn’s loft. The background shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the arched ribs for the roof. The ribs angle greater within the loft than on the main floor.

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This frame shows some of the bales that are stored in the loft of the barn. This barn was never used to store loose hay.

Moser Homestead 1954

Aerial photo of the Moser homestead in 1956. The barn in the left aspect of the frame is the original barn on the property.

Location

52.815114, -111.908982                                       SW 25-44-14 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1968

Features: Weather vane on southern edge of roof

Roof Shape: Arched

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Esther Moser’s 5-Year Diary

Esther Moser kept a diary everyday for the majority of her life. She recorded everything from the temperature that day to the duties she completed around her home. She wrote about a few interesting events involving the barn in 1967 and 1968. The following entries are from September 18th, 1967, March 20th, 1968, and March 22nd, 1968.

Esther Moser also recorded a line on June 5th, 1968 that might be of interest to some readers. It can be seen below.

Esther Moser Diary June 5, 1968

Norbert (Norb) and Esther Moser Family History

Moser Family History 1

“Norbert and Esther Moser Family History”. The Pleasant Country: Volume Two Killam                         and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

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