Brausen-Kroetsch

History

This barn was built in the summer of 1970. The original barn, built by Joe and Carrie Brausen, Glen Brausen’s parents, burned to the ground in May of 1970. The milking machine, cream separator, and other items were lost, but only one cow, a calf, and some pigs perished. During construction of the barn, the cows were milked outside, often in pouring rain.

This arch rib barn originally had drop siding, cedar shingles, and a small sliding hay door on each end of the hay loft. A lean-to addition was built on the eastern side of the barn to house pigs and calves. Herman Roth was the main carpenter with many friends and neighbours helping out. When construction was completed, a barn dance was held in the loft as a sign of appreciation for all the help from those friends and neighbours.

Glen and Germaine Brausen, sons of Joe and Carrie, continued to milk cows in this new barn and ship cream. Later the barn was used for calving beef cows. Glen continued to raise pigs in the lean-to, mostly for the annual family hog butchering. As many as 13 pigs were butchered one year.

Glen and Germaine’s sons especially enjoyed playing in the barn; even daring one of their brothers to jump out of the hayloft. It only winded him, but his brothers thought he was dead. Instead of rushing to his aid, a lengthy discussion ensued about how much trouble they were going to be in!

In the mid 90’s, the barn roof was tinned, and the barn painted. Colin and Barb purchased the land after the passing of Barb’s dad, Glen. Presently the barn is used for storage.

Kroetsch, Colin and Barb. Personal communication. 27 Jul. 2017.

Kroetsch, Colin and Barb. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area: Volume           II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 644. Print.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof and part of the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows part of the eastern face of the barn and the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the barn’s peak. Notice how there is no hay hood. That is because the barn was built during the era of hay bales and not loose hay.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the cement in-front of the barn’s southern door. It is marked with the date, “1970”, the year the barn was built. 

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This frame is of the eastern set of stalls. This photo was taken from the northern end of the barn whilst looking south-east. Notice the stanchions and vacuum system for milking cows.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn on the ground floor. It was taken from the northern end of the barn whilst looking south-west. The staircase to the loft is in the background of this frame – the south-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof. The photo was taken from the southern end of the barn whilst looking north-west.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. This frame was taken from the southern end of the barn whilst looking north. Notice how the shed addition joins to the main barn.

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This frame shows one of the glued laminated timbers that creates the barn’s arched roof and the northern half of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the southern half of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the southern face of the main barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the top of the staircase to the loft. The staircase is in the south-western corner of the main barn.

Location

52.745494, -112.305558                           NW 15-42-16 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1970

Features: None

Roof Shape: Arched

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Aerial Photo

Brausen-Kroetsch Farmyard 2004.jpg

Farmyard in 2004.

Please click here and here to see the two other barns that the Kroetsch family owns.

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