Bendfeld

History

This barn was built in 1918 by Bernard Bendfeld with the help of a local construction company. The barn was originally used as a shelter for horses and milk cows. The loft of the barn was used for hay and straw storage. Bernard Bendfeld emigrated from Germany to the US in 1901. He homesteaded the quarter of land this barn stands on in 1904. The Feddema brothers filed for the land on Bernard’s behalf. Their barn is also featured in this database.

In 1965, Raymond Bendfeld, the youngest son of the late Bernard Bendfeld, took over this farmstead. He and his wife, Leona, used the barn for milking cows. They also added pig pens and a pen for chickens inside the western shed of the barn. Additionally, this barn was occasionally used for calving. The loft of the barn was always used by Raymond for hay and straw storage. A “few” baseballs went through the barn windows in Raymond’s rea, so they are not all original.

In 2000, the farmstead was purchased by Brent and Denise Bendfeld. When their two children were young, the family sometimes raised chickens, sheep, and goats inside the barns. Now the barn is mainly used for storage of hay bales and other items. Brent and Denise had the roof of the barn tinned in 2003 and the outside walls tinned in 2006. Many of the barn’s windows and doors were covered with tin at this time. However, beneath the tin, these features still exist and can be exposed in the future if desired. The interior of the barn remains mostly untouched since its initial construction

Bendfeld, Denise. Personal communication. 31 Aug. 2017.

Bendfeld, Brent and Denise. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area:               Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 616. Print.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the loft door on the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn. The Bendfelds installed man-doors where the sliding barn door used to be.

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This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn. The Bendfelds covered up all of the windows and doors on this frame of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern side of the inside of the barn. The door in the left aspect of this frame is the entry into the chicken coop. The chicken coop is the south-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern set of stalls. These used to be horse stalls but were changed into pig pens by Raymond Bendfeld.

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This frame shows the staircase to the loft in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way between the horse and milk cow stalls. At the end of this corridor, is the feed chute in the milk cow holding area.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way in the milking area of the barn. The closed door-way in the background of this frame is on the western side of the barn in the shed addition. The shed addition was used to feed cows.

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This frame shows one of the milking stalls complete with metal stanchions.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way in the northern end of the barn. These walk-ways were used to bring feed to the milk cows.

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This frame shows the pen inside the shed. The northern end of the shed was used to hold cows.

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This frame shows the feed chute and roof of the shed addition.

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The Bendfeld farmstead painted on a cream can.

Location

52.681988, -112.130915                                      NW 04-43-15 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1918

Features: Hay hood, hay track, hay carrier

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red

Decorations: The year of construction is on the southern face of the barn

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Metal

Foundation: Concrete

Additional History on the Property

Bernard Bendfeld Family History

“Bendfeld, Bernard”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area: Volume                       I. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical  Society, 1982. Print.

Brent and Denise Bendfeld Family History

Bendfeld Family History 4.jpg

“Bendfeld, Brent and Denise”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area:                   Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 1982. Print.

Kienetz-Weller

History

Austin and Christine Kienetz came to the Heisler area from Minnesota in 1902. They filled for a homestead on the quarter section which this barn stands on. Austin and Christine most likely had the barn built between 1915 and 1920. A local builder and helpful neighbours would have been needed to erect the barn.

Leo Weller purchased this property in 1945 from Eloy and Ethyl Kienetz. Eloy was the son of Austin and Christine Kienetz. It is known that Leo used the barn for dairy cows and beef cattle. However, in the 1940s, it was common for farms to have many different types of livestock in order to feed the family members who lived there. As such, it is likely that the barn on this quarter also housed pigs and other small livestock. While Leo owned the barn in the 1960s, new shingles were installed on its roof.

Roger, son of Leo, and Doreen Weller took ownership of this property in the late 1960s. Roger was the last person to keep livestock inside this barn. He raised milk cows and beef cattle and so milking and calving would have occurred in the barn. He milked cows until the newly introduced milk quota turned him off that business venture. Roger kept raising beef cattle for many years after that. As such, the barn was surrounded by corrals and pasture while he owned the property. Metal cladding was installed to replaced the old roof shingles in the 1980s. Roger moved to town sometime after this and the property sat vacant for many years.

Colin Weller acquired the quarter and this barn in 2013 from his mother, Peggy Weller. He moved onto this property in 2015, after his new house was built. Colin has plans to restore the barn in the very near future.

Weller, Colin. Personal communication. 30 Aug. 2017.

Weller, Colin. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area: Volume II. 1st ed.               Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 684. Print.

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This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the hay hood on the western face of the barn. Notice the hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the western face and part of the northern side of the barn. Notice the white trim which accents all of the barn’s doors and windows.

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This frame is a close-up of the wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. Notice the red star under the peak of each side of the cupola and the metal spire which rests on top. The metal spire would have acted like a lightening rod.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof. The hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof is more noticeable from this angle.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the eastern face of the barn and the wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. Notice the different placement of the windows on this eastern face as compared to the western face. 

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This frame shows the eastern face and southern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the different placement of the loft door on the southern side as compared to the northern side of the barn. Additionally, this side of the barn has five windows whereas the northern side only has four. 

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof and the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way inside the barn. This photo was taken whilst standing in the western doorway while looking east. In the top of this frame, one can see the tubing for the vacuum milking machine.

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This frame shows the northern set of stalls. The corner in this frame is the north-eastern corner of the barn. Wooden boards were laid on the floor of this barn to level the walk-way but the dirt beneath it has settled. 

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This frame shows the eastern half of the southern stalls. This frame was taken while standing in the eastern doorway looking south-west. 

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This frame is a close-up of the tack racks on the southern set of posts.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the posts which support the roof at the joint between the two slopes. The door in this frame is the bale door on the southern side of the barn. 

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This frame shows the hay carrier system’s platform on the eastern face of the barn. A man would need to stand on the platform to operate the hay carrier. 

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This frame is a close-up of the barn’s hay carrier.

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This frame shows the stairway to the barn’s loft. The corner in the left aspect of this frame is the north-western corner of the barn. The door above the staircase would have been used to ferry bales into and out of the barn’s loft. 

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof. 

Aerial Photo.jpg

Aerial photo of farm in the 1980s.

Location

52.787246, -112.269551                                             SW 16-44-16 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Fair

Construction Date: 1915 – 1920

Features: Single wooden cupola and hay hood, hay track, and hay carrier

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates,

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement except in south-eastern corner where it is made of field stones

Shogren-Janzen

History

This barn was built by Andrew Shogren in 1915. The land was homestead by the Shogren family in 1906. Right away, in 1907, Andrew Shogren built the lean-to part of the barn (the southern shed on the main barn). The gambrel roofed part of the barn was not built until 1915. It is known that a barn dance took place inside the loft the newly built barn in 1915 (see “Additional History on the Property” for more).

Pete Janzen bought the quarter this barn sits on in 1945. The barn was not in very good condition at the time. Pete replaced the rotted foundation sills and braced the inside of the barn so it would not lean. In the mid 1970’s, the original cedar shingles were replaced with asphalt shingles and the barn was painted white. In 2002, the wooden foundation sills were again replaced. Don Janzen lifted the barn up to replace them and to pour a concrete foundation. At this time, a metal roof was also added to the barn.

Pete Janzen immigrated to Canada from Germany with his parents Edward and Anna Janzen in 1924. The family were what was known as “Black Sea Germans“. They had to flee their homeland North of the Black Sea after turmoil in the region claimed the lives of most of their family members. Heisler was a known German settlement at the time.

This barn has housed all types of livestock over the years. Andrew Shogren used it for milk cows, beef cattle, and horses. When Pete owned it, he had horses in the barn up until about 1994 and milk cows until about 2001. For a time, Pete even raised pigs and rabbits in the barn. Don Janzen began living on the property full-time in 1977. He kept beef cattle in the beginning but stopped keeping livestock in the late 1970’s. The barn has been used for storage ever since.

Janzen, Don. Personal communication. 29 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof and the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face and northern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame is a close-up of the hay hood on the western face of the barn. Although a hay hood was built, this barn never had a hay carrier or hay track.

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This frame is of the northern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern face of the barn and the shed.

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This frame is a close-up of the door on the eastern face of the barn. Notice the teeth marks on the door. Remnants from when there used to be corrals and beef cattle surrounding the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the eastern face of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the eastern face of the barn and the southern half of the barn’s roof.

barn 2

This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and western face of the barn. This photo was taken in the mid 1970’s, when the barn was painted for the first time.

barn 3

This frame shows the western face of the barn. This photo was taken in the mid 1970’s. It was at this time that the barn was painted for the first time.

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This frame shows the barn in 2002. The sills of the barn rotted out and had to be replaced. Don Janzen lifted the barn and repaired its foundation. The corner in the background is the south-eastern corner of the main barn. The main wall in this picture was originally the outside of the shed on the barn.

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This frame shows the south-western corner of the main barn in 2002. When the barn was lifted, the stalls had to be removed.

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This frame shows the inside of the shed on the barn in 2002. The corner in the background of this frame is the south-western corner of the shed.

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Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 1954.

FARM 80

Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 1980.

FARM 2003

Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 2003.

Location

52.490518, -111.894743                                        NW  36-40-14 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1915

Features: Hay hood

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: White

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

An Account on the Barn by Annie Gamroth Strachan

Excerpt from Peter Gamroth Family History.jpg

Strachan, Annie Gamroth. “Peter Gamroth Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of                       Galahad and District. 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Andrew Shogren Family History

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Shogren, Effie. “Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Shogren”. Golden Echoes: A History of                              Galahad and District. 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Edward Janzen Family History

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Janzen, Pete. “Edward Janzen Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of Galahad and District.           1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Pete Janzen Family History

 

Janzen, Marce. “Pete Janzen Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of Galahad and District.                 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

 

Albrecht-Lehmann

History

This quarter section was homesteaded by Charles Albrecht. Charles married May Bovencamp and the two had three girls: Evelyn, Violet, and Geraldine. May Albrecht moved into the Killam Auxiliary Hospital in 1971 and the farm was sold.

Dusty and Twyla Lehmann moved to the property this barn stands on in 2013. They were both heavily involved in rodeo and circumstance brought them to the Flagstaff region. Immediately after arrival, Dusty and Twyla repaired and tinned the roof of the barn to protect the barn from water damage. That year, they also cleaned the barn and removed the mangers and some of the stalls on the main floor of the barn. The Lehmanns used the old wood from the barn to build a kitchen table for their home. In 2016, they ran electricity to Dusty’s shop and to the barn. They also built the tack room in the south-eastern corner of the barn. In late 2016, Dusty and Twyla repaired the frame for the southern door and replaced the southern door. In the spring of 2017, the Lehmanns built new corrals around the barn to house their horses and donkeys. In August of 2017 Dusty and Twyla were married in the barn.

Lehmann, Dusty and Twyla. Personal communication. 25 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn. The Lehmanns recently tinned the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn. Notice the distinctive gambrel shaped roof.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn. The Lehmanns built many new corals and pens in 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn. Like many other barns and farm buildings, water takes its toll on northern face of this barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame again shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the barn’s hay hood. Notice the hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the first stall in the south-western corner of the barn. Notice the cement floor throughout the barn.

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This frame shows the second and third stalls in the south-western corner of the barn. The boards that separated these two stalls were removed to create a larger storage area.

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This frame shows the final two stalls on the western side of the barn. The corner in the background of this frame is the north-western corner of the barn. The Lehmanns saved the wood from between thetwo stalls in the previous picture and are storing it here for later use. Dusty Lehmann is a skilled hand woodworker and plans to use the boards for furniture he is building.

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This frame shows the north-eastern corner stall. The mangers have been removed from all of the stalls.

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This frame shows the stalls on the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the south-eastern stall area. These stalls were removed by the Lehmanns and then a tack room was built in their place.

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This frame shows the inside of the tack room. These saddle racks were built by Dusty Lehmann.

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This frame is a close-up of one of the saddle racks. The corner in the background of this frame is the north-western corner of the tack room.

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This frame shows another aspect of the tack room; the halter/harness racks.

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This frame shows the staircase to the barn’s loft. This door is located in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the hay sling near the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the barn’s hay carrier and hay track.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the ventilation chute that used to connect to a single wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. This cupola had to be removed when the barn’s roof was tinned.

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The Lehmanns use the barn and their corrals for their horses and donkeys.

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Location

52.885633, -111.484954                                        NE -14-45-11 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date:

Features: Hay hood, hay carrier, and hay track

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: White diagonal trim, no names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Renovation Pictures

Lehmann Renos 1

In 2013, the Lehmanns repaired the barn’s roof. This work replaced the original cedar shingles with black tin.

Lehmann Renos 2

In 2016, the Lehmanns braced the southern door’s frame and installed a new sliding door.

Lehmann 1

On top of the work done on the barn, Dusty and Twyla have also repaired many of the farm’s outbuildings. One of the old garages in the yard was made into a work space for Dusty Lehmann’s hand woodworking.

Charles and May Albrecht Family History

albrecht-family-history.jpgAlbrecht, C. “Charles Albrecht Story”. Verdant Valleys In and Around Lougheed. 1st ed.                 Lougheed: Lougheed Women’s Institute, 1972. Print.

 

Borgel-Tindall

History

It is not known when this barn was constructed but it is known that it was moved to the property it now stands on in 1949. The barn was moved by Floyd Robinson at the request of the John and Laverne Borgel family. The Borgel family purchased this quarter of land from the White family. The barn was purchased from Nels Sorenson and moved from SW 02-44-13 W4. In order to get the barn to this property, the barn had to pass under a power line! Before the move, the barn did not have the western shed addition or the two wooden cupolas. These were both added by John Borgel in the early 1950’s.

The Borgel family originally used the barn for cow-calf pairs and their draft horses. However, in 1951 the family began milking cows and had the barn remodeled for that use. This meant that milking stanchions and a feed walk-way were added to the western side of the main barn.

In the fall of 1974, John and Laverne sold the property to Jim and Eldred Tindall. The pair had four children: Lyn Alice, Lyle, Shelaine, and Sheldon. The Tindall family changed many of the milking stalls and all of the horse stalls into box stalls for their beef cattle operation. The last time the barn was completely painted was in 1978/79. At this time, the phrase, “B&T RANCHES” was also painted on the southern face of the barn.

Sheldon and Donna Tindall were married in 1988 and both have lived on this property ever since. They raised their two children, Ashley and Jonathan, here.

Tindall, Sheldon and Donna. Personal communication. 22 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face and western half of the barn’s roof. Notice the shed addition on the western side of the barn. This addition was installed after the barn was moved here.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof. Notice the wooden cupola chute in the first slope of the barn’s roof. Both cupolas were installed after the barn was moved.

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This frame shows the western side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn. Notice the paired windows.

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This frame shows the eastern side and southern face of the barn. Notice the hay hood and hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn. Notice the faded “RANCHES” phrase below the loft door. The face used to have the phrase “B&T RANCHES” painted on it.

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This frame shows the first stall and the walk-way into the shed addition on the western half of the barn.

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This frame shows all of the first stall on the south-western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the stall to the north of the previous frame. Notice the milking stanchions. All of the stalls on this side used to be milking stalls when the Borgel family owned the barn.

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This frame shows the penned area and staircase to the loft in the north-western corner of the barn. This large box stall was created by the Tindall family so that they could store their beef cattle inside the barn.

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This frame shows the bottom of the cupola’s ventilation chute. It is positioned in the middle of the barn on the western side. There is another one directly across from this one. The chutes were added by the Borgel family, after the barn was moved.

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This frame shows some of the wrought iron tack hooks on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the pathway through the main barn. The door in the background is the northern door of the main barn.

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This frame shows the eastern set of stalls. These were used by the Borgel family’s draft horses. The Tindall family changed these stalls into box stalls so that they could have their beef cattle inside the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the barn’s loft. The face in the foreground is the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the cupola’s ventilation chute. You can tell that the chutes were added after the fact because they are made of different wood than what was used in the rest of the barn.

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This frame shows the trusses which create the barn’s gambrel roof shape.

moved-barn-1949-sedgewick-book-778.jpg

“Farm Buildings”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding                          Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982, pg. 778. Print.

Aerial Photo 1954

Aerial photo circa 1954. Notice how the shed addition and cupolas are installed 5 years after the move of the barn.

Aerial Photo 1976

Aerial photo circa 1976.

Location

52.787265, -111.751915                                       SE 13-44-13 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Fair

Construction Date: Unknown

Features: Two cupola chutes

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: White

Decorations: Used to have, “B&T RANCHES” painted on the southern face

Roof Covering: Metal and cedar shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Land Title Search from the Glenbow Museum

The following information about this quarter of land can be found in the Glenbow Museum’s Archives of CPR Land Sales at this link.

Land Title

Jim and Eldred Tindall Family History

Tindal Family History 1 - Sedgewick.jpg

“Jim and Eldred Tindall”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding                      Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982. Print.

John and Laverne Borgel Family History

For the following histories, the first two images are from Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding Districts while the second two images are from The Pleasant Country: Volume I, Killam and District 1903-1993.

Arntzen, Carol (Borgel). “The John Borgel Family”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of                      Sedgewick and Surrounding Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical                    Society, 1982. Print.

The Family. “John and Laverne Borgel Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume I Killam                and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Nels and Ida Sorenson Family History

Sorenson Family History 1 - Killam.jpg

“Nels and Ida Minnie Sorenson Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume II Killam and                      District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Roth

History

This barn was built in 1916 using frame construction and balloon framing. It is likely that Barney Schares had a hand in building it. Barney built many barns in the Heisler area and this barn is very similar to his other barns. The barn was constructed by the Roth family to replace an old log barn that stood in the yard prior to 1914. Perhaps Barney Schares just provided the blue print and know-how to the Roth family. We do know for certain that the new barn was built with the help of friends and neighbours.

Burkhard and Augustine Roth came to the Heisler area in 1904 from North Dakota. They officially homesteaded a quarter section of land 2 miles west of the property this barn sits on. Homestead rules stated that a family could live on a piece of land within 2 miles of their homestead quarter. Burkhard had purchased the quarter this barn sits on, a CPR quarter, in 1903 from someone he knew in the States. He liked the CPR quarter better than his homestead land and so the family began residing there.

Burkhard, Augustine, and family moved to the outskirts of Cheweelah, Washington for 3 years, from 1911-1914. They rented out the land near Heisler while they were away to Joe Leeb. By that time, they had already had six children: Killian (died young), Annie, Martha, Carl, Herman, William. William Roth was only three-years-old at the time of the move and six-years-old when they moved back to the Heisler area. However, he remembers that he didn’t like the mountains very much. No, the prairie suited him better and so he was glad when the family made the trek home. Burkhard passed away in 1923 and William helped his mother on the family farm after that. In 1933, William married Mary Rakoz and the two lived on the quarter this barn stands on with Augustine until she moved to Heisler in 1935.

The barn was built 30 feet high for the storage of loose hay. There were no balers at the time of construction. Instead, the hay was cut with a mower, raked by horse drawn equipment into windrows, and forked by hand onto a hay wagon. When a full wagon of hay pulled in front of the barn, the southern loft door would be lowered and slings of hay would then be lifted into the loft by the horses. The hay carrier and all of its related systems accomplished this momentous task. If you wish to see a video of a hay carrier system in action or learn more about hay carriers please click here and scroll to the “Hay Carrier System” section.

The younger children of the Roth family got the job of following the hay sling to the back of the barn’s loft and pulling the trip rope that dropped the hay in the sling into a pile. Pull and run, so as not to get covered, was the trick. Randy Roth, William and Mary’s youngest child, remembers the loft being full to the roof’s peak with loose hay. He could then climb the pile up and get into the large wooden cupula to look out to the north to see the Spring Lake Church! Hay was forked down chutes into the mangers on the main level where the horses and cows would eat. All the children had the opportunity to fall through a chute at least once.

In the early years, the western shed housed the horses that were used to work the land and thus it is still known as the “horse barn.” Ken Roth, William and Mary’s oldest child, still remembers having to harrow with the horses. The main part of the barn was for cows. Milk from the cows in the early years was left to rest to allow the cream to rise to the top. Then the cream was skimmed off for making butter. Some cream and butter were taken to town to exchange for groceries. Later, a cream separator, first turned by hand with a crank and later powered by electricity, was used to obtain the cream. A cream truck would come from Sedgewick to pick up the cream and leave a cheque that was used for groceries. The milk was not sold but instead eaten by the family or given to the pigs.

Tractors came to the Roth farm in the early 1940’s so not as many horses were needed. The southern end of the “horse barn” was used for pigs and calves yet it was referred to, and is still referred to, as the “horse barn.” For many year, the northern end of the main barn housed pigs in old milking stalls that had been renovated into pig pens. However, most of the main barn was still used for milking cows. In the mid 1960’s, Doug Roth, William and Mary’s second youngest child, brought in a milking machine, possibly a Westfalia, that made milking much faster and easier on the hands. William Roth continued using the barn until the mid 1970’s. After that, the animals were split between Ken and Doug and the barn has been used for storage ever since.

William and Mary Roth moved into Daysland in 1987. Randy and Barb Roth moved back to the quarter this barn stands on in 1991 from Forestburg.

Roth, Randy and Barb. Personal communication. 17 Aug. 2017.

Roth, Randy and Barb. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area: Volume           II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 671-672. Print.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn’s roof and the shed addition.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof and the southern face of the barn. Notice how the barn has three small wooden cupolas on the edge of the roof and one large cupola in the center of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn and shed addition.

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This frame is a close-up of the loft door on the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the hay hood and hay track on the southern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the center wooden cupola on the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the guide for the hay carrier rope in the loft.

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This frame is of the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and part of the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the north-western corner of the barn’s foundation.

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This frame shows the inside of the shed addition on the western side of the barn. This area was used by the Roth family’s horses. The stalls pictured are on the northern end of the barn.

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This frame shows the north-south walk-way inside the western shed. This frame was taken from the north whilst looking south.

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This frame shows the western wall inside the shed. Notice the tack harness in the left aspect of this frame.

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This frame shows the window in the previous frame. Underneath the window are the initials “KMR”. It was carved by Kenneth Michael Roth, Randy Roth’s brother.

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This frame shows the walk-way, part of the roof, and some of the stalls inside the western addition.

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This frame shows the staircase into the barn’s loft. Additionally, there is a door underneath the staircase that leads into the main barn.

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Above the staircase, the floor boards of the loft have rotted away.

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This frame shows one of the stalls inside the main barn. This stall is located in the south-western corner of the barn. The walk-way from the western shed into the main barn is located just out of this frame to the left.

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This frame shows the penned area in the northern end of the main barn. The main barn used to house milk cows and pigs.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn. Notice the bale elevator and the trusses for the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the northern face and eastern part of the barn’s roof. Notice the rope for the hay carrier in the right aspect of this frame.

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This frame is a close-up of one of the feed chutes on the western side of the main barn.

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This frame shows the chute for the smaller cupola in the south-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the loft door on the southern face of the main barn.

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This frame shows the hay carrier in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the loft above the western shed. Notice the hay chutes in the floor of the loft. These allow hay to be thrown down into the mangers inside the western shed.

Location

52.717520, -112.222832                                       SW 23-43-16 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Poor

Construction Date: 1916

Features: Seven wooden cupolas; one large, six small, hay hood, hay carrier, and hay track, shed addition, weather vane

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Faded, used to be red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Concrete

Additional History on the Property

Burkhard and Augustine Roth Family History

 

Roth, Herman and Bill. “Roth, Burkhard and Augustine”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A                         History of Heisler and Area: Volume I. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical                               Society, 1982. Print.

William (Bill) and Mary Roth Family History

The Family. “Roth, William and Mary”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and                    Area: Volume I. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 1982. Print.

Randy and Barb Roth Family History

“Roth, Randy and Barb”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area: Volume                    II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 1982. Print.

Badry

History

There were 2 identical chicken barns and a milk barn built from sod by William and Frank Badry in about 1928 on the SW 31-42-15 W4. The following description is for the two sod chicken barns. The walls of both chicken barns were made of sod, specifically dried slough bottoms that were cut with a plough by horse. The sod pieces were about 16 inches wide and were laid next to each other to create 2 feet thick walls. The roofs of the barns were created using a layer of branches, leaves, and straw with six to eight inches of black soil on top. The roof had a slight arched shape to it because of the materials used and the fact that the support posts in the center of the barn were all a few inches taller than the sod walls. The floors of the barns were concrete. The windows faced to the south on both barns to let light in as there was no power in the barns originally. Power was installed in the barns in about 1950. Four ventilators were built into each barn. Each ventilator was square, created using planed lumber, and ran from the ground up through the peak of the barn’s roof. There was a partition wall in the center of the barn which created two separate rooms in each barn. William and Frank Badry made water troughs out of metal bins and wooden boards, roosts out of logs, and nest boxes out of lumber to furnish the barn. Both barns were approximately 30 ft. x 60 ft. x 20 ft. when they were built. While these two barns are not longer standing, they are very unique due to their construction method. Many sod buildings have not been able to stand the test of time, especially if they were well-used.

Frank Badry came to the Heisler area in 1919. He married Mary Tarnowski on October 22, 1922. The couple rented various homesteads in the area before purchasing the land this barn sits on in 1932. They lived there until 1965 when they moved into Camrose. Their son, Victor, and his wife, Maxine, began living on this property in 1959 in a separate house in the south-eastern part of the yard. Due to each barn’s proximity to their homes, Frank and Mary kept their chickens in the northern barn and Victor and Maxine kept their chickens in the southern barn. The chicks were first kept in the brooder house and then moved to the sod barns. There were approximately 250 chickens kept in each half of the barn.

By the time Victor and Maxine Badry moved out to the farm, the north chicken barn had partially collapsed. The damaged portion, the eastern end of the northern barn, was removed and replaced with chicken wire to create an outdoor pen. The remainder of the northern barn stood until 1975. The southern barn collapsed in June of 1970 after several inches of rain. The collapsed roof trapped the chickens. Some chickens were saved by digging through the sod but several hundred died. It was a terrible incident for the family. Victor and Maxine lived on the property until about 1991 when they moved into Heisler.

Beginning in 1984, Shawn Badry, Victor and Maxine’s son, began milking his own cows on the family farm. He also helped with his father’s farming operation, milking cows and doing chores. He, his wife, Janice, have lived on the property since October 1991.

Badry, Maxine. Personal communication. 17 Aug. 2017.

Badry, Roger. Personal communication. 17 Aug. 2017.

“Badry, Shawn and Janice”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area:                    Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 2017, pg. 227-278. Print.

Badry Homestead 1956

Badry homestead in 1956.

Badry Sod Barn 1

Close-up of the northern chicken barn. The eastern end, right side of the pictured barn, was partially collapsed by the time Victor and Marion moved to the farm. The windows on the barns face south to let light in.

Badry Sod Barn 1956

Northern chicken sod barn in 1956. The two men in the picture are most likely Willam and Frank Badry.

Location

Northern Barn: 52.659305, -112.161298                         SW 31-42-15 W4

Southern Barn: 52.658073, -112.160714                         SW 31-42-15 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Destroyed

Construction Date: 1928

Features: Four ventilators on each barn

Roof Shape: Slightly arched

Paint: None

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Branches, straw, and sod

Siding: None, sod walls

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Frank and Mary Badry Family History

Badry, Maxine. “Badry, Frank, Mary and Family”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of             Heisler and Area: Volume I. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 1982. Print.

Victor and Maxine Badry Family History

Badry, Maxine. “Badry, Victor and Maxine”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler       and Area: Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 2017. Print.

Shawn and Janice Badry Family History

“Badry, Shawn and Janice”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area:                    Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 2017. Print.

Moser

History

This barn was built in 1968, after a fire destroyed the original barn on the property on September 18th, 1967. It is the smallest barn in this database and was built using more modern methods. The arched ribbed roof and high-grade concrete foundation are some of the last innovations in barn building.

Norbert (Norb) and Esther Moser were married November 23, 1942 and bought the property this barn sits on in 1943. Esther Moser kept a diary, which she wrote in everyday. She recorded the fire that destroyed the family’s original barn and the delivery of parts for the new barn. Photos of these entries can be seen at the bottom of this page.

It is believed that this barn was built by the Taralson family as they had a building business in Killam at the time. The barn was built using frame construction and balloon framing. The arched ribs for the roof of the barn run from the foundation to the peak. The current barn on the property has only been used to store square bales because it was built after the loose-hay era. The current barn does not have a hay track, hay carrier, or hay hood.

Norb and Esther always had cattle while they lived on this property. They used their barns for cattle and 4-H calves. Additionally, they also had riding horses that they would sometimes keep or saddle within the barn. In 1972, Norb and Esther moved into Killam and their son, Jack, moved to this property.

In June of 1977 Jack Moser married Sharon Graham. The pair raised their four boys on the family farm; Jamie, Christopher, Adam, and Justin. Throughout the years, Jack and Sharon have used the current barn on their property for horses, calves, baby chicks in the spring, and “Shamrock” – the milk cow.  Many a barn cat have made the barn their home. As well, the four Moser boys and their friends were often found playing in the loft of the barn.

It is believed that the original barn on this property burnt down due to spontaneous ignition. On September 18th, 1967, the Moser family finished filling the loft of their original barn with fresh hay. It was a hot day and it is believed that the hay in loft got to a high enough temperature that it ignited. Luckily, there were no animals inside the barn at the time. However, the barn and most of its contents could not be saved. Jack Moser remembers running home from the neighbours house to see his father, Norb, trying to save their horses’ tack. Norb was able to save a few items before he was unable to reenter the barn.

Moser, Jack and Sharon. Personal communication. 15 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the eastern side and the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows a close-up of the weather vane on the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern half of the western wall. This frame was taken whilst standing in the doorway on the southern end of the barn. Notice the stands for saddles on the western wall.

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This frame shows the chop bin in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the ladder up into the loft on the southern end of the barn. The doorway in the right aspect of this frame is the door in the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the western door of the barn.

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This frame shows the western wall of the barn. Notice the arched ribs for the barn’s roof in the center of the frame.

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This frame shows the horse stall on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the walkway through the barn as taken from the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the walkway through the barn as taken from the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the horse stall on the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern pen in the northern end of the barn. Notice the cement floor in the pen.

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Both the north-eastern and the north-western pens have angled mangers like this.

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This frame shows the inside of the barn’s loft. The background shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the arched ribs for the roof. The ribs angle greater within the loft than on the main floor.

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This frame shows some of the bales that are stored in the loft of the barn. This barn was never used to store loose hay.

Moser Homestead 1954

Aerial photo of the Moser homestead in 1956. The barn in the left aspect of the frame is the original barn on the property.

Location

52.815114, -111.908982                                       SW 25-44-14 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1968

Features: Weather vane on southern edge of roof

Roof Shape: Arched

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Esther Moser’s 5-Year Diary

Esther Moser kept a diary everyday for the majority of her life. She recorded everything from the temperature that day to the duties she completed around her home. She wrote about a few interesting events involving the barn in 1967 and 1968. The following entries are from September 18th, 1967, March 20th, 1968, and March 22nd, 1968.

Esther Moser also recorded a line on June 5th, 1968 that might be of interest to some readers. It can be seen below.

Esther Moser Diary June 5, 1968

Norbert (Norb) and Esther Moser Family History

Moser Family History 1

“Norbert and Esther Moser Family History”. The Pleasant Country: Volume Two Killam                         and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Gale-Morel

History

This barn is believed to have been built in the 1930s by Byron Gale with the help of his family and neighbours. Ed Gale, Byron’s father, came to the area in 1917 from St. Thomas, Ontario. Byron served in World War II and bought the farm from Ed when he came back home after the war.

Jean and Helen Morel moved to the property this barn sits on in 1952. They acquired the land under the Veterans Land Act as Jean had served in the Second World War. Jean had been living in the Galahad area with his uncle, August Billiot, before he was called back to France at the beginning of the war and decided to come back to the area after the war. He met Helen while returning an incorrectly mailed letter while still in the Galahad region. They moved to this property after their marriage in 1949.

Jean and Helen used the barn for milk cows in the early days. Five milk cows were enough to keep them afloat. Helen remembers that they would receive the cream cheque and most of it would be gone by Monday to pay the expenses. However, after the family purchased some piglets with loan money from a friend, they found life much more stable. In recent years, the barn has been used for storage or left vacant.

The barn is very unique because the ground floor walls are cordwood construction. From the outside, this can look like field stone construction but it is actually debarked trees laid perpendicular to the wall’s direction and bound together with mortar. This method makes for a very durable building.

Morel, Helen. Personal communication. 28 Jul. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn and the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn. Notice the single cupola in the middle of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn and part of the northern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of one of the outer walls for the western set of stalls. Notice the post in the left aspect of this frame. The post supports the beams on the barn’s loft.

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This frame is a close-up of the cordwood walls that makeup the barn.

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This frame shows an electrical box on the exterior of the north-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the sliding door on the northern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the gate near the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn and part of the eastern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof and part of the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn. Notice how there is no hay hood or hay track in this barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the sliding door on the southern face of the barn. Notice how the sliding door has a smaller door built into it.

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This frame shows the south-eastern stall inside the barn.

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This frame shows the north-eastern penned area inside the barn.

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This frame shows the north-western corner of the barn. Notice how the cordwood walls look from the inside of the barn.

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This frame shows the western penned area in the northern half of the barn.

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This frame shows the western stalls in the southern half of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the staircase to the barn’s loft.

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This frame shows the trusses which make-up the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof.

Location

52.347180, -112.041897                                       SW 13-39-15 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Fair

Construction Date: Believed 1930s

Features: Single cupola

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: None

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Cordwood

Foundation: Cordwood and cement

Additional History on the Property

Gale Family History

Gale, B., Murray, A., & O’Neill, B. “Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Gale”. Halkirk Home Fires and                      Area. 1st ed. Halkirk: Halkirk Historical Society, 1985. Print.

Morel Family History

Morel Family History.jpg

Morel, Helen. “Jean Morel”. Halkirk Home Fires and Area. 1st ed. Halkirk: Halkirk                              Historical Society, 1985. Print.

Brausen-Kroetsch

History

This barn was built in the summer of 1970. The original barn, built by Joe and Carrie Brausen, Glen Brausen’s parents, burned to the ground in May of 1970. The milking machine, cream separator, and other items were lost, but only one cow, a calf, and some pigs perished. During construction of the barn, the cows were milked outside, often in pouring rain.

This arch rib barn originally had drop siding, cedar shingles, and a small sliding hay door on each end of the hay loft. A lean-to addition was built on the eastern side of the barn to house pigs and calves. Herman Roth was the main carpenter with many friends and neighbours helping out. When construction was completed, a barn dance was held in the loft as a sign of appreciation for all the help from those friends and neighbours.

Glen and Germaine Brausen, sons of Joe and Carrie, continued to milk cows in this new barn and ship cream. Later the barn was used for calving beef cows. Glen continued to raise pigs in the lean-to, mostly for the annual family hog butchering. As many as 13 pigs were butchered one year.

Glen and Germaine’s sons especially enjoyed playing in the barn; even daring one of their brothers to jump out of the hayloft. It only winded him, but his brothers thought he was dead. Instead of rushing to his aid, a lengthy discussion ensued about how much trouble they were going to be in!

In the mid 90’s, the barn roof was tinned, and the barn painted. Colin and Barb purchased the land after the passing of Barb’s dad, Glen. Presently the barn is used for storage.

Kroetsch, Colin and Barb. Personal communication. 27 Jul. 2017.

Kroetsch, Colin and Barb. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area: Volume           II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 644. Print.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof and part of the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows part of the eastern face of the barn and the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the barn’s peak. Notice how there is no hay hood. That is because the barn was built during the era of hay bales and not loose hay.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the cement in-front of the barn’s southern door. It is marked with the date, “1970”, the year the barn was built. 

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This frame is of the eastern set of stalls. This photo was taken from the northern end of the barn whilst looking south-east. Notice the stanchions and vacuum system for milking cows.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn on the ground floor. It was taken from the northern end of the barn whilst looking south-west. The staircase to the loft is in the background of this frame – the south-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof. The photo was taken from the southern end of the barn whilst looking north-west.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. This frame was taken from the southern end of the barn whilst looking north. Notice how the shed addition joins to the main barn.

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This frame shows one of the glued laminated timbers that creates the barn’s arched roof and the northern half of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the southern half of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the southern face of the main barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the top of the staircase to the loft. The staircase is in the south-western corner of the main barn.

Location

52.745494, -112.305558                           NW 15-42-16 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1970

Features: None

Roof Shape: Arched

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Aerial Photo

Brausen-Kroetsch Farmyard 2004.jpg

Farmyard in 2004.

Please click here and here to see the two other barns that the Kroetsch family owns.