Treaty Hill: Daly Barns

History

The section of land this barn and these outbuildings are built on was a C.P.R. quarter.  Please click here and see Page 12 and here to learn more about C.P.R. Ready Made farms. It is believed that this property was first owned by Colonel Patrick J., CMG DSO, and Alice (nee Knight) Daly, RRC.

Patrick Joseph Daly was born in Australia in 1872, son of James Daly, of Alstonville, Richmond River, New South Wales. He worked as a carpenter until the age of 29, when he set off to South Africa to serve in the Second Boer War. Patrick was a young cavalryman, a lancer, who served with the West Australia contingent (6th Western Australia Mounted Infantry) from 1901 to 1902. Patrick Daly departed from Fremantle, Western Australia on board the SS Ulstermore (click here for images) on March 6th, 1901 and arrived in Durban, South Africa on March 29th, 1901. He was promoted to Corporal from Private some time in 1901. From there he was “promoted to Sergeant by the Commander-in-Chief” Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, “for gallant service done on three occasions with scouts, when parties of Boers were taken”. He advanced from Sergeant to Lieutenant on January 18th, 1902 for work done while present in operations within the Transvaal Colony and the Orange River Colony. Patrick Daly was then severely wounded at Roodepoort, South Africa on February 26th, 1902 but was also mentioned five times in Commander-in-Chief Despatches. For his “services during the operations in South Africa” (London Gazette, 31 October 1902), he was awarded the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order). He was confirmed in the rank of Lieutenant, as honorary rank, upon retiring after the Second Boer War. After being wounded, Patrick was admitted to a Pretoria Hospital. It was there that he met Miss Alice Knight, a nurse. Much like a Hollywood movie, the patient fell in love with his nurse.

f5fe063094a808f41197e112657cd1b2

Distinguished Service Order during Second Boer War. Retrieved from https://www.angloboerwar.com/images/multithumb_thumbs/f5fe063094a808f41197e112657cd1b2.jpg

Alice Knight, born 1875, joined the nursing sisters of the British Army, the Royal Army Medical Corps, when she was 19 years old. After a few years of service, she was sent into a ranging war in South Africa in late 1901. The battle at Ladysmith, South Africa during the Second Boer War concluded with an excruciating four month period, where ever-increasing cases of enteric fever ran rampant and resources were precariously low. Alice was present throughout the entirety of this siege of Ladysmith. The town was besieged for 118 days and, towards the end of the struggle, city residents were living off of their working animals, oxen and horses. After securing Ladysmith, a retreat of the Boer troops in March of 1900 caused the British Army to advance onward to the North, pushing the Boer forces back. The more northerly city of Pretoria was surrendered to British forces on June 5th, 1900. The Second Boer War ended in Pretoria with the signing of the Peace of Vereeniging on May 31st, 1902. Alice was recognized in a London Gazette Despatch on Tuesday, June 17th, 1902 as a civilian nurse for “care of prisoners of war in Pretoria”. She would also receive the decoration of the Royal Red Cross, along with six other nurses, for “care of prisoners of war in Pretoria“. This award was administered on the 26th of June, 1902 for service in South Africa in the year 1902. Alice moved with the British forces to Pretoria to serve in the No. 22 General Hospital, formerly the Imperial Yeomanry Branch Hospital in Pretoria, where she would meet Patrick Daly.

On May 28th, 1902, she would tend to a young cavalryman who had been subject to seven rifle shots. As stated earlier, the pair fell in love. The war was almost over and Alice was sent back to England only to secure her discharge and return to Capetown, South Africa. On March 17th, 1903, Alice Knight wed Patrick Daly.

The Dalys spent several years in Africa before moving to England, where their only daughter Eileen was born on September 10th, 1910. The family would move to Calgary, Alberta, Canada late in the year 1910. It was here that Patrick Daly began a partnership with Pat Burns, one of the Big Four; or founding members of the Calgary Stampede. The Daly family owned two farms at this time; one in Strathmore, Alberta and one in Lougheed, Alberta.

With the outbreak of World War I on August 14th, 1914, both Dalys met the call and volunteered to serve in the war effort again. Patrick began recruiting for a legion frontiersman soon after war broke out. Then, in November of 1914, he joined the 31st Battalion at Calgary with the rank of Captain. Patrick Daly became Lieutenant of the 103rd Regiment of Canada on February 21st, 1915. Both he and Alice would see service in France but Alice would actually see battle long before her husband would.

Before Patrick joined the 31st Batttalion, Alice had already left for New York. Upon arriving there, they were told it would be four or five weeks before she and her counterpart, Mrs. L. Amy of Calgary, would be able to cross the Atlantic for Europe. However, the pair did not end up waiting anywhere near that long. Rumors of submarine attacks on passenger ships caused widespread ticket cancellations to pour into the steamship offices. As such, Mrs. Daly and Mrs. Amy were able to set sail for France on September 20th, 1914. Alice would arrive a year before her husband, as the 6th Canadian Brigade of the 2nd Canadian Division did not land until October and November of 1915. During 1917 and 1918, Alice was proposed to have been stationed at Lady Astor’s Red Cross hospital, called the HRH Duchess of Connaught Hospital, close to Taplow, Buckinghamshire, England. It was said that while serving in Europe, she experienced the impact of a Big Bertha shell. One of them, fired from seventy miles away, went through the roof of her apartment building.

Patrick Daly served in World War I from 1915 to 1917, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. On March 24th, 1917, Lieutenant Colonel Daly would receive the Order of St. Michael and St. George (CMG).

bdo263a

Order of St. Michael and St. George C.M.G. Retrieved from https://www.emedals.com/order-of-st-michael-and-st-george-c-m-g-gb1151

In 1918, Patrick would command the 27th Battalion of Winnipeg (which was part of the 2nd Division6th Infantry Brigade along with its sister 28th Battalion, 29th, and 31st Calgary Battalions) and be given the rank of full Colonel. He would be placed on duty at Le Havre, Normandy, France and remain in France until after the Armistice.

After the Armistice of 1918, the Dalys would return to Alberta but would only stay in Calgary until 1919. At which point, the Dalys sold their farm in Strathmore and moved to their farm in the Treaty Hill District, South of Lougheed, Alberta and East of Alliance, Alberta.

Alice Daly would pass away in August of 1930 at the age off 55 from pneumonia contracted after a surgery for another illness. While in the Lougheed area, she was a staple. The town and district residents required her services whenever injured. Her loss was mourned greatly by the community. Many said that it took great knowledge, technical skill, tender hands, and a giving heart to help as she did.

Col. Patrick Daly would pass away on February 12th, 1931 at 59 years old after an operation for appendicitis. He was taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Hardisty on February 8th but complications took him in a couple of days. A military funeral was held in the Lougheed Roman Catholic Church. His horse, with an empty saddle having on top boots and spurs reversed, was led by Sergent A. Skyes behind the hearse.

Daly Funeral 9Daly Funeral 7Daly Funeral 8

Daly Funeral 5

Present Day Barn Photos

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This frame shows the norther face and eastern side of an outbuilding on the farm.

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This frame shows the eastern side and southern face of the outbuilding.

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This frame shows the southern face and western side of the outbuilding.

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This frame shows the western side of the chicken coop in the yard.

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This frame shows the southern side of the chicken coop. There are lots of windows on the southern side to let light into the building.

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This frame shows the northern side and western side of the barn.

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This frame shows an entryway on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the cement and field stone foundation that supports that barn.

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This frame shows the western side and southern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern side and eastern side of the barn. The barn is leaning badly and has fallen off the foundation.

_MG_5208

This frame shows the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the ground floor barn door on the southern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the barn facing the north-western corner

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This frame shows the chop bin in the north-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows a painted notation in the north-western corner of the barn.

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A close-up of the writing shows, “LH April 20 1930”.

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This frame shows what the stalls and mangers would have looked like inside the barn. Only one remains, on the southern half of the barn.

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This frame shows the stone foundation on the southern end of the barn. Note that the foundation heads off to the West as if there used to be more barn that way. If it would have, the barn may have been a gable-roofed barn.

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This frame shows the train of buried concrete heading West from the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows an old red tractor parked in the pasture nearby the barn and house.

Location

Land Layout

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Poor

Construction Date: Unknown, pre 1930.

Features: None

Roof Shape: Shed

Paint: Red

Decorations: No names or dates on outside, “LH April 20, 1930” painted on inside

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement and field stone

Additional History on the Property

These barns are not the only structure on this property. Treaty Hill is home to these outbuildings and barn, Geodetic Survey markers, and a homestead house.

THE COLONEL’S LADY BY DIXON CRAIG

Daly 1Daly 2

Craig, Dixon. “The Colonel’s Lady”. As the Wheel Turns: A History of Merna and                            District. 1st ed. Sedgewick: The Community Press, 1971. Print

COLONEL PATRICK J. DALY, C.M.G., D.S.O.

Daly History 3Daly History 4

No Author. “Colonel Patrick J. Daly, C.M.G., D.S.O.”. Verdant Valleys In and Around                                Lougheed. 1st ed. Lougheed: Lougheed Women’s Institute, 1972. Print.

COL. DALY FAMILY

Daly 5

Alcorn, Phyllis. “Col. Daly Family”. In the Bend of the Battle: A History of Alliance and                District. 1st ed. Alliance: Alliance Lions Club, 1976. Print.

COL. P.J. DALY

Daly 6

Alcorn, Phyllis. “Col. P.J. Daly”. In the Bend of the Battle; THE NEXT GENERATION: A               History of Alliance and District. 1st ed. Edmonton: Douglas Printing, 2005. Print.

Treaty Hill: Daly House

History

The section of land this home is built on was a C.P.R. quarter.  Please click here and see Page 12 and here to learn more about CPR Ready Made farms. It is believed that this property was first owned by Colonel Patrick J., CMG DSO, and Alice (nee Knight) Daly, RRC.

Patrick Joseph Daly was born in Australia in 1872, son of James Daly, of Alstonville, Richmond River, New South Wales. He worked as a carpenter until the age of 29, when he set off to South Africa to serve in the Second Boer War. Patrick was a young cavalryman, a lancer, who served with the West Australia contingent (6th Western Australia Mounted Infantry) from 1901 to 1902. Patrick Daly departed from Fremantle, Western Australia on board the SS Ulstermore (click here for images) on March 6th, 1901 and arrived in Durban, South Africa on March 29th, 1901. He was promoted to Corporal from Private some time in 1901. From there he was “promoted to Sergeant by the Commander-in-ChiefFrederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, “for gallant service done on three occasions with scouts, when parties of Boers were taken”. He advanced from Sergeant to Lieutenant on January 18th, 1902 for work done while present in operations within the Transvaal Colony and the Orange River Colony. Patrick Daly was then severely wounded at Roodepoort, South Africa on February 26th, 1902 but was also mentioned five times in Commander-in-Chief Despatches. For his “services during the operations in South Africa” (London Gazette, 31 October 1902), he was awarded the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order). He was confirmed in the rank of Lieutenant, as honorary rank, upon retiring after the Second Boer War. After being wounded, Patrick was admitted to a Pretoria Hospital. It was there that he met Miss Alice Knight, a nurse. Much like a Hollywood movie, the patient fell in love with his nurse.

f5fe063094a808f41197e112657cd1b2

Distinguished Service Order during Second Boer War. Retrieved from https://www.angloboerwar.com/images/multithumb_thumbs/f5fe063094a808f41197e112657cd1b2.jpg

Alice Knight, born 1875, joined the nursing sisters of the British Army, the Royal Army Medical Corps, when she was 19 years old. After a few years of service, she was sent into a ranging war in South Africa in late 1901. The battle at Ladysmith, South Africa during the Second Boer War concluded with an excruciating four month period, where ever-increasing cases of enteric fever ran rampant and resources were precariously low. Alice was present throughout the entirety of this siege of Ladysmith. The town was besieged for 118 days and, towards the end of the struggle, city residents were living off of their working animals, oxen and horses. After securing Ladysmith, a retreat of the Boer troops in March of 1900 caused the British Army to advance onward to the North, pushing the Boer forces back. The more northerly city of Pretoria was surrendered to British forces on June 5th, 1900. The Second Boer War ended in Pretoria with the signing of the Peace of Vereeniging on May 31st, 1902. Alice was recognized in a London Gazette Despatch on Tuesday, June 17th, 1902 as a civilian nurse for “care of prisoners of war in Pretoria”. She would also receive the decoration of the Royal Red Cross, along with six other nurses, for “care of prisoners of war in Pretoria“. This award was administered on the 26th of June, 1902 for service in South Africa in the year 1902. Alice moved with the British forces to Pretoria to serve in the No. 22 General Hospital, formerly the Imperial Yeomanry Branch Hospital in Pretoria, where she would meet Patrick Daly.

On May 28th, 1902, she would tend to a young cavalryman who had been subject to seven rifle shots. As stated earlier, the pair fell in love. The war was almost over and Alice was sent back to England only to secure her discharge and return to Capetown, South Africa. On March 17th, 1903, Alice Knight wed Patrick Daly.

The Dalys spent several years in Africa before moving to England, where their only daughter Eileen was born on September 10th, 1910. The family would move to Calgary, Alberta, Canada late in the year 1910. It was here that Patrick Daly began a partnership with Pat Burns, one of the Big Four; or founding members of the Calgary Stampede. The Daly family owned two farms at this time; one in Strathmore, Alberta and one in Lougheed, Alberta.

With the outbreak of World War I on August 14th, 1914, both Dalys met the call and volunteered to serve in the war effort again. Patrick began recruiting for a legion frontiersman soon after war broke out. Then, in November of 1914, he joined the 31st Battalion at Calgary with the rank of Captain. Patrick Daly became Lieutenant of the 103rd Regiment of Canada on February 21st, 1915. Both he and Alice would see service in France but Alice would actually see battle long before her husband would.

Before Patrick joined the 31st Batttalion, Alice had already left for New York. Upon arriving there, they were told it would be four or five weeks before she and her counterpart, Mrs. L. Amy of Calgary, would be able to cross the Atlantic for Europe. However, the pair did not end up waiting anywhere near that long. Rumors of submarine attacks on passenger ships caused widespread ticket cancellations to pour into the steamship offices. As such, Mrs. Daly and Mrs. Amy were able to set sail for France on September 20th, 1914. Alice would arrive a year before her husband, as the 6th Canadian Brigade of the 2nd Canadian Division did not land until October and November of 1915. During 1917 and 1918, Alice was proposed to have been stationed at Lady Astor’s Red Cross hospital, called the HRH Duchess of Connaught Hospital, close to Taplow, Buckinghamshire, England. It was said that while serving in Europe, she experienced the impact of a Big Bertha shell. One of them, fired from seventy miles away, went through the roof of her apartment building.

Patrick Daly served in World War I from 1915 to 1917, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. On March 24th, 1917, Lieutenant Colonel Daly would receive the Order of St. Michael and St. George (CMG).

bdo263a

Order of St. Michael and St. George C.M.G. Retrieved from https://www.emedals.com/order-of-st-michael-and-st-george-c-m-g-gb1151

In 1918, Patrick would command the 27th Battalion of Winnipeg (which was part of the 2nd Division, 6th Infantry Brigade along with its sister 28th Battalion, 29th, and 31st Calgary Battalions) and be given the rank of full Colonel. He would be placed on duty at Le Havre, Normandy, France and remain in France until after the Armistice.

After the Armistice of 1918, the Dalys would return to Alberta but would only stay in Calgary until 1919. At which point, the Dalys sold their farm in Strathmore and moved to their farm in the Treaty Hill District, South of Lougheed, Alberta and East of Alliance, Alberta.

Alice Daly would pass away in August of 1930 at the age off 55 from pneumonia contracted after a surgery for another illness. While in the Lougheed area, she was a staple. The town and district residents required her services whenever injured. Her loss was mourned greatly by the community. Many said that it took great knowledge, technical skill, tender hands, and a giving heart to help as she did.

Col. Patrick Daly would pass away on February 12th, 1931 at 59 years old after an operation for appendicitis. He was taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Hardisty on February 8th but complications took him in a couple of days. A military funeral was held in the Lougheed Roman Catholic Church. His horse, with an empty saddle having on top boots and spurs reversed, was led by Sergent A. Skyes behind the hearse.

Daly Funeral 9Daly Funeral 7Daly Funeral 8

 

Daly Funeral 5

Present Day House Photos

 

_MG_5040

This frame shows a portion of the southern side of the house and most of the eastern side of the house. Most of the structure is obscured by maple trees.

_MG_5044

This frame shows the eastern side of the house, which would have been the kitchen and pantry area.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the house from a more northerly aspect.

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This frame shows the western and northern sides of the house.

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This frame shows the northern side of the house.

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This frame shows the western side of the house.

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This frame shows the front porch on the south-western side of the house.

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This frame shows the southern side of the shed addition on the eastern side of the house. The addition makes the sitting room near the inside staircase more spacious. The wall in this frame is the southern wall.

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This frame shows the southern side of the house above the porch.

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This frame shows the staircase to the second floor of the house. The staircase is positioned just off the entryway from the porch.

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This frame shows the northern wall inside the sitting room with the shed addition.

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This frame shows the north-eastern corner of the shed addition.

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This frame shows the eastern wall of the shed addition and the house.

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This frame shows the northern wall of another sitting room on the first floor of the home.

_MG_5084

This frame shows the same sitting room. The walls in this photo are on the western side of the house.

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This frame shows a second entry into the home from the porch. The staircase for the home is on the other side of the wall on the left side of this frame. The door and window are built into the southern wall of the house.

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This frame shows the south-western corner of another sitting room.

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The window in this frame is in the western wall of the house.

_MG_5093

This frame shows the window in one of the rooms on the eastern side of the house on the first floor. This room was most likely a dining room.

_MG_5094

This frame shows the same room as the frame before. Through the doorway on the left side of this frame (to the North) is a room which was probably the kitchen followed by a small pantry or storage room.

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This frame shows a bedroom on the second floor of the house. The window in this frame is the second floor window on the western side of the house.

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This frame shows one of the closets in the house. They were all quite small. The hole in the wall next to the closet would have been for heating system.

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This frame shows the other end of the western bedroom on the second floor. The top of the staircase is visible just outside the brown door. Another closet is in the background on the left side of this frame.

IMG_5122

This frame shows the basement inside the house. The basement is only under the south-western portion of the house.

IMG_5125

This frame shows the staircase down into the basement. The two staircases are in the same position in the house. To the left (West) of the staircase in this frame is another room in the basement.

IMG_5129

This frame shows the entrance to an underground cellar that is on the property too.

IMG_5131

The cellar was hand-dug and used to keep preserves cold all year. The roof over the entrance to the cellar is made of large timbers laid parallel to the door in a line. Dirt was then shaped to cover the logs. This stabilized the entrance and stopped cave-ins.

Location

land-layout1.png

Characteristics

House Condition: Poor

Construction Date: 1910

Features: No chimney

Roof Shape: Gable with dormers

Paint: Brown

Decorations: No names of dates, white paint around windows and doors.

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden shiplap

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

This house is not the only structure on this property. Treaty Hill is home to this house, outbuildings and a barn, and some Geodetic Survey markers.

The Colonel’s Lady by Dixon Craig

Daly 1Daly 2

Craig, Dixon. “The Colonel’s Lady”. As the Wheel Turns: A History of Merna and                            District. 1st ed. Sedgewick: The Community Press, 1971. Print

Colonel Patrick J. Daly, C.M.G., D.S.O.

Daly History 3Daly History 4

No Author. “Colonel Patrick J. Daly, C.M.G., D.S.O.”. Verdant Valleys In and Around                                Lougheed. 1st ed. Lougheed: Lougheed Women’s Institute, 1972. Print.

Col. Daly Family

Daly 5

Alcorn, Phyllis. “Col. Daly Family”. In the Bend of the Battle: A History of Alliance and                District. 1st ed. Alliance: Alliance Lions Club, 1976. Print.

Col. P.J. Daly

Daly 6

Alcorn, Phyllis. “Col. P.J. Daly”. In the Bend of the Battle; THE NEXT GENERATION: A               History of Alliance and District. 1st ed. Edmonton: Douglas Printing, 2005. Print.

 

Olsen-Patten

History

Lind Olsen came from Leirfjorden, Norway to the Viking, Alberta area in the winter of 1907 at the age of 19. It was said that he walked most of the way from Wetaskiwin, Alberta to his homestead that winter. He credited an old fur coat with keeping him alive; however, it is likely that being originally from far North of the Arctic Circle in Norway also helped. Lind left his home in Norway in 1906 likely because he was not the oldest in his family and so there would have been little if not any property for him to inherit over there.

Lind also worked in Edmonton to make money to support his farm, as most early settlers did. It is noteworthy that he helped build the Alberta Legislative Building, a building which his grandson Verlyn Olson would work in as an MLA almost 100 years later! While working in Edmonton, Lind met and married Lena Bjerkan, who had moved to Edmonton in 1912 and worked in a hospital there. It was said that Lena missed setting sail on the RMS Titanic by 2 weeks.

After marrying in 1916, the pair moved to a farm North of Sedgewick, Alberta which was previously owned by Arnt Jacobson. Lind and Lena had their first son Lloyd Sr. in 1917 followed by Roy in 1920 (while on a trip to Norway), Irene in 1924, Norma in 1927, Esther in 1929, and Lloyd Jr. in 1930. In 1927, Lloyd Sr. contracted polio at the tender age of 10 and succumbed to the disease soon after. This was not the end of the Olsen family’s endurance as the following year the family’s relatives lost the patriarch of their family, John Olsen. John died on January 27th of complications after an acute infection of influenza. John and Hannah Olsen’s daughter, Christine, became very close with Lena Olsen after the tragedy and stay so for years to come. It was said that Christine had the most infectious laugh and love of live. She would often tell of how her mother fell out of the famliy’s wagon after one of the brothers hit a bump on a trip to town. Hannah was quite stark and serious about the affair but Christine could soften anyone up by telling the tale.

The tragedies and hardships of homesteader life were dulled by friendships with neighbours and new comers to the area. Lind and Lena were always keen to foster those who were new to the area until they could get themselves settled into the new lifestyle. Additionally, they seemed to always host Sunday dinner after church for members of the congregation.

Esther Anderson (nee Olsen) says that she always remembers the barn, “Just being there.” She believes that it was built in 1921, 8 years before she was born. The only other tale she shared was that one had to be careful, whilst playing up in the barn’s loft, not to fall through the holes in the floor meant for throwing feed through.

Verlyn Olson remembers coming to visit his grandparents on their farm as a kid. While there he would have to help bring the cattle into the barn to be milked. When milking began, it was his job to turn the cream separator.

Lind and Lena Olsen moved off the farm to Camrose, Alberta in 1960. Lloyd Jr. farmed on the place for a few years but moved to Edmonton in the late 1960s. The farm sat empty for a few years while the land was rented out.

John Patten was one of those renters. In 1981, his son, Pat Patten, bought the property this barn sits on and in 1983 they moved to the property. The Pattens raised their family here too, Jason and Candace. They had a few horses, sheep, and cows in the barn over the years. In fact, Candace got into sheep at a young age and sold them once they were grown. With that money, she bought a few cows, which she grew and sold in order to buy a horse.

The Patten family had the old house moved off the property to somewhere near Hay Lakes, Alberta. It still stands and is lived in there today.

Olson, Verlyn. Personal communication. 18 Jun. 2018.

Patten, Jeanette. Personal communication. 18 Jun. 2018.

_MG_5421

This frame shows the southern side and western face of the barn.

_MG_5430

This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern half of the horse barn.

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This frame shows the northern half of the milking barn.

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This frame shows the eastern face and southern side of the milking barn.

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This frame shows the window in the eastern face of the horse barn and the wooden cupola on the horse barn.

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This frame shows the southern side of the horse barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the eastern milking barn.

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This frame shows the floor inside the milking barn.

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This frame shows the doorways between the milking and horse barns. The middle door would have led to a room which would have held the milk condenser and vacuum machine.

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This frame shows the inside of the horse barn. There are four stalls like this one in the horse barn. The walkway between the two sets of stalls run north-south.

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This frame shows the ladder to the horse barn’s loft.

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This frame shows the western face of the chicken coop in the yard. Notice the skillion and lean-to roof.

_MG_5478

This frame shows the western face and northern side of the chicken coop.

_MG_5428

This frame shows the southern side and eastern face of the chicken coop.

Location

52.902547, -111.683752                                        SE 28-45-12 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1921

Features: Two wooden cupolas, one on each barn’s roof

Roof Shape: Gable on eastern cow barn, gambrel on western horse barn

Paint: Red

Decorations: No names or dates, white trim

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Olsen Family History

 

“The John Olsen Story”, “Oswald Olsen Story”, and “The Family History of Lind and                       Lena Olsen”. Sedgewick Sentinel. 1st ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical                           Society, 1982. Print.

Patten Family HistoryPatten Family History 1.jpg

“John Patten”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding Districts.                       1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982. Print

Wardville-Sunlight School District History

The Olsen children attended Sunlight School.

 

“Wardville-Sunlight School District”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and                Surrounding Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982. Print

Titus-Combs-Schweitzer-Loder

History

The quarter that this barn sits on was a CPR Quarter, see SE-05-45-13-W4 on the Selby School District map below. Please click here and see Page 12 and here to learn more about CPR Ready Made farms.

Selby 2

Map of the Selby School District

“Youngstown and Selby School District No. 1545”. The Pleasant Country: Volume One          Killam and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Rolf Titus is the first is the first known inhabitant of the quarter.

In 1925, Harvey Dale Combs, originally from Council Bluff, Iowa, and Naomi Ethel (James), originally of Nebraska, bought the Titus’ farm and lived there until 1941. It was said that the house there was built by a bachelor named Willis who decided to return to England. This house still stands and is lived in today.

On December 12th, 1945, Paul (Toby) and Florence (nee McMahon) Schweitzer moved to the property. They bought it from Lena and George McPherson and the Schweitzers lived there for 27 years!

In August of 2017, Josh and Kelly Loder purchased the acreage. They cleaned up the barn and the yard to accommodate their horses. They removed the stalls on the north-east side of the barn to create more usable space, cleaned the barn’s loft, and painted various features of the barn a light teal – Kelly’s favourite colour. Kelly noted that after strong wind storms she and Josh often go around the outside of the barn looking for nails that have jutted out from the siding due to the wind.

Loder, Kelly and Josh. Personal communication. 4 Jun. 2018.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn and the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame is of the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the loft’s hay door.

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This frame shows a close-up of the ground floor door in the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern face and norther half of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof.

 

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This frame shows the northern side and western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face and southern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern side of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the southern side of the barn.

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This frame shows a gate for a box stall and an old wagon wheel.

 

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This frame is of the eastern door of the barn. The photo was taken while standing in the center of the barn whilst looking East.

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This frame shows the north-eastern set of stalls. The walls for these stalls were removed to create more space.

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This frame shows the walkway through the barn. It was taken whilst standing in the eastern doorway. The door in the background of the frame is the western barn door.

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This frame shows the south-eastern set of stalls.

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This frame shows the south-western box stall. Kelly painted the gate a light teal colour.

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This frame shows the north-western box stall.

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This frame shows a close-up of a salt block holder in the north-western box stall. Kelly Loder has also painted this light teal.

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This frame shows the two doors in the middle of the barn on the northern half. The door on the left side of this frame is to the tack room and the door on the right is to the staircase.

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This frame peers into the tack room.

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This frame shows the inside of the tack room. Two black bins sit against the northern wall.

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This frame shows the side of the staircase to the barn’s loft. The Loder’s have pieces of tack hanging on hooks nailed to the staircase wall.

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This frame shows the staircase to the barn’s loft.

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This frame shows the top of the staircase in the barn. The roof in this frame is the northern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame is of the inside of the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame shows parts of the southern set of rafters for the barn’s roof. The roof joins into the walls from the ground floor.

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This frame shows two “falling tongues” or shafts for a wagon. The neck yoke is also intact on one of the wagon shafts (the one on the left).

Location

52.845741, -111.843936                                  SE-05-45-13-W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1950’s

Features: None

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: White

Decorations: None original, presently many light teal accents.

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Rolf Titus Family History

Titus Family History 1.jpg

“Ney and Bertha Titus Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume Two Killam and District                 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Harvey Dale and Naomi Ethel (nee James) Combs Family History

Combs Family History 1.jpg

“Harvey and Naomi Combs Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume One Killam                            and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

The Combs children attended the Selby rural school.

“Youngstown and Selby School District No. 1545”. The Pleasant Country: Volume One             Killam and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

McPherson Family History

“Neil and Bertha McPherson Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume Two Killam                          and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Paul (Toby) and Florence (nee McMahon) Schweitzer Family History

“Paul (Toby) and Florence Schweitzer Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume Two                      Killam and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993.                    Print.

Gibb

History

Bill Gibb’s grandfather, William, and grandmother, Maude, homesteaded the property this barn sits on in 1904. Bill and his wife, Verna, received the Alberta Century Farm and Ranch Award in 2004 for 100 years of family farming on the original Skillymarno homestead. William and Maude chose to name the family home “Skillymarno” after a farm that William grew up next to in Scotland, his homeland.

20170531_145304_HDR.jpgWilliam and Maude Gibb came to the area from Iowa in 1904. William had been up to Canada twice before 1904 to survey for potential land to homestead. William and Maude had two small sons at the time, both boys were born in 1902 in Iowa.  There names were Kenneth Samuel Gibb and Marion William Gibb. Maude Gibb went the whole journey with the two two-year-olds on her knees – she said she would never do that again! In 1905, William and Maude had a third child, a girl named Florence. Bill Gibb says that, to his knowledge, she was the first Caucasian girl born in the area.

The barn was built in June of 1916. It was a very rainy June and that made construction very difficult. A large construction company out of Edmonton was brought in and built the barn. The many men they brought in slept onsite.

The wood in the barn is all fir and came by rail to the region, most likely from British Columbia. Construction was started in June of 1916 and ended later that summer. The sand used to create cement was hauled by the wagon load to the barn site from a nearby hill. The concrete foundation and floor needed about 300 horse-drawn wagon loads of sand. Additionally, they needed about 300 horse-drawn wagon loads of sand to level the ground on the North side of the barn. The sand for the North side was an accidental necessity – they weren’t planning on the need. The first 300 loads of sand that the Gibb family collected were unfit for mixing to make concrete. As a result, the family had to dig deeper to reach better quality sand. They used the original loads for leveling the North side of the barn once they discovered that it was uneven.

The barn is 36 feet by 36 feet by 100 feet. It also has 51 rafters spaced 2 feet apart. The concrete for the foundation and ground floor was all hand mixed and hand poured. The barn was first painted in 1948 by four young men. Their names were Freddie Vanheist, Clayton Hayward, Hunton Hayward, and Bob Weeks. They painted the siding red and the shingles green. The northern half of the barn used to house horses while the southern half housed beef cattle. The cattle were pure bred Black Angus from Scotland.

William Gibb established his family’s Black Angus operation on February 8, 1921. Before this, he took a long trip to Scotland in 1920/1921 to search for and buy Angus. The trip was extensive and William kept a log of the purchases, you can see photos of it below. William purchased nine females and 2 bulls. The family sold and shipped Angus all over the world: Canada, the United States, France, Argentina, and even back to Scotland.

20170531_142117_hdr.jpg20170531_142052_HDR20170531_142059_HDRKen Gibb inherited the barn after William. Ken used the barn for Angus until about 1950. After that, Ken kept most of his herd outside in pens and only calved and halter-broke cattle inside the barn. Bill Gibb was born to Ken and Helen Gibb in May of 1941. Bill and Verna stopped raising Black Angus in 1985, their herd had been active for 64 years.

Currently, the barn sits idle with cable supports helping to hold it up. Luckily, the barn was never used to store grain as many other barns would have been.

Gibb, Bill. Personal communication. 31 May 2017.

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Farm yard circa 1990’s

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This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and western side of the barn. An addition is also visible on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn. The addition is also visible on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the main door on the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame is of the inside of the barn looking North. It was taken whilst standing in the southern doorway.

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This image is of the concrete floor inside the barn.

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This frame shows two of the gates to the stalls in the southern half of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern horse stalls.

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This frame shows the walkway between the western wall and the north-western set of stalls.

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This frame shows the inside of the addition on the western side of the building.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s loft. This frame was taken whilst standing on the north-western side of the barn looking southeast.

Location

52.768021, -111.919860                                        NE 02-44-14 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Poor

Construction Date: 1916

Features: Two wooden cupolas and hay hood, hay track, and hay carrier

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Wooden shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

William Gibb

20170531_143113_HDR.jpg20170531_142536_HDR

Willam Gibb. Aberdeen-Angus Cattle in Canada. 1st ed. Crawford, F.W. , 1985, pg. 616. Print.

History of Gibb Herds

20170531_142925_HDR20170531_142943_HDR20170531_143003_HDR20170531_143040_HDR

The Gibb Herds of Killam, Alberta – From 1920 – Skillymarno and Grand View.                         The Canadian Angus History: Update. 1st ed. The Canadian Aberdeen-Angus                    Association, 1985, pg. 104-106 Print.

Bendfeld

History

This barn was built in 1918 by Bernard Bendfeld with the help of a local construction company. The barn was originally used as a shelter for horses and milk cows. The loft of the barn was used for hay and straw storage. Bernard Bendfeld emigrated from Germany to the US in 1901. He homesteaded the quarter of land this barn stands on in 1904. The Feddema brothers filed for the land on Bernard’s behalf. Their barn is also featured in this database.

In 1965, Raymond Bendfeld, the youngest son of the late Bernard Bendfeld, took over this farmstead. He and his wife, Leona, used the barn for milking cows. They also added pig pens and a pen for chickens inside the western shed of the barn. Additionally, this barn was occasionally used for calving. The loft of the barn was always used by Raymond for hay and straw storage. A “few” baseballs went through the barn windows in Raymond’s rea, so they are not all original.

In 2000, the farmstead was purchased by Brent and Denise Bendfeld. When their two children were young, the family sometimes raised chickens, sheep, and goats inside the barns. Now the barn is mainly used for storage of hay bales and other items. Brent and Denise had the roof of the barn tinned in 2003 and the outside walls tinned in 2006. Many of the barn’s windows and doors were covered with tin at this time. However, beneath the tin, these features still exist and can be exposed in the future if desired. The interior of the barn remains mostly untouched since its initial construction

Bendfeld, Denise. Personal communication. 31 Aug. 2017.

Bendfeld, Brent and Denise. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area:               Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 616. Print.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows a close-up of the loft door on the southern face of the barn.

IMG_0018

This frame shows the eastern side of the barn. The Bendfelds installed man-doors where the sliding barn door used to be.

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This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

IMG_0023

This frame shows the northern face of the barn. The Bendfelds covered up all of the windows and doors on this frame of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern side of the inside of the barn. The door in the left aspect of this frame is the entry into the chicken coop. The chicken coop is the south-western corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern set of stalls. These used to be horse stalls but were changed into pig pens by Raymond Bendfeld.

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This frame shows the staircase to the loft in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way between the horse and milk cow stalls. At the end of this corridor, is the feed chute in the milk cow holding area.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way in the milking area of the barn. The closed door-way in the background of this frame is on the western side of the barn in the shed addition. The shed addition was used to feed cows.

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This frame shows one of the milking stalls complete with metal stanchions.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way in the northern end of the barn. These walk-ways were used to bring feed to the milk cows.

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This frame shows the pen inside the shed. The northern end of the shed was used to hold cows.

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This frame shows the feed chute and roof of the shed addition.

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The Bendfeld farmstead painted on a cream can.

Location

52.681988, -112.130915                                      NW 04-43-15 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1918

Features: Hay hood, hay track, hay carrier

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red

Decorations: The year of construction is on the southern face of the barn

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Metal

Foundation: Concrete

Additional History on the Property

Bernard Bendfeld Family History

“Bendfeld, Bernard”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area: Volume                       I. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical  Society, 1982. Print.

Brent and Denise Bendfeld Family History

Bendfeld Family History 4.jpg

“Bendfeld, Brent and Denise”. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of Heisler and Area:                   Volume II. 1st ed. Heisler: Heisler Historical Society, 1982. Print.

Kienetz-Weller

History

Austin and Christine Kienetz came to the Heisler area from Minnesota in 1902. They filled for a homestead on the quarter section which this barn stands on. Austin and Christine most likely had the barn built between 1915 and 1920. A local builder and helpful neighbours would have been needed to erect the barn.

Leo Weller purchased this property in 1945 from Eloy and Ethyl Kienetz. Eloy was the son of Austin and Christine Kienetz. It is known that Leo used the barn for dairy cows and beef cattle. However, in the 1940s, it was common for farms to have many different types of livestock in order to feed the family members who lived there. As such, it is likely that the barn on this quarter also housed pigs and other small livestock. While Leo owned the barn in the 1960s, new shingles were installed on its roof.

Roger, son of Leo, and Doreen Weller took ownership of this property in the late 1960s. Roger was the last person to keep livestock inside this barn. He raised milk cows and beef cattle and so milking and calving would have occurred in the barn. He milked cows until the newly introduced milk quota turned him off that business venture. Roger kept raising beef cattle for many years after that. As such, the barn was surrounded by corrals and pasture while he owned the property. Metal cladding was installed to replaced the old roof shingles in the 1980s. Roger moved to town sometime after this and the property sat vacant for many years.

Colin Weller acquired the quarter and this barn in 2013 from his mother, Peggy Weller. He moved onto this property in 2015, after his new house was built. Colin has plans to restore the barn in the very near future.

Weller, Colin. Personal communication. 30 Aug. 2017.

Weller, Colin. Wagon Trails in the Sod: A History of the Heisler Area: Volume II. 1st ed.               Heisler: Heisler Community Historical Society, 2017, pg. 684. Print.

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This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the hay hood on the western face of the barn. Notice the hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the western face and part of the northern side of the barn. Notice the white trim which accents all of the barn’s doors and windows.

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This frame is a close-up of the wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. Notice the red star under the peak of each side of the cupola and the metal spire which rests on top. The metal spire would have acted like a lightening rod.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof. The hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof is more noticeable from this angle.

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and the eastern face of the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the eastern face of the barn and the wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. Notice the different placement of the windows on this eastern face as compared to the western face. 

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This frame shows the eastern face and southern half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the different placement of the loft door on the southern side as compared to the northern side of the barn. Additionally, this side of the barn has five windows whereas the northern side only has four. 

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof and the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the east-west walk-way inside the barn. This photo was taken whilst standing in the western doorway while looking east. In the top of this frame, one can see the tubing for the vacuum milking machine.

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This frame shows the northern set of stalls. The corner in this frame is the north-eastern corner of the barn. Wooden boards were laid on the floor of this barn to level the walk-way but the dirt beneath it has settled. 

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This frame shows the eastern half of the southern stalls. This frame was taken while standing in the eastern doorway looking south-west. 

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This frame is a close-up of the tack racks on the southern set of posts.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the posts which support the roof at the joint between the two slopes. The door in this frame is the bale door on the southern side of the barn. 

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This frame shows the hay carrier system’s platform on the eastern face of the barn. A man would need to stand on the platform to operate the hay carrier. 

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This frame is a close-up of the barn’s hay carrier.

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This frame shows the stairway to the barn’s loft. The corner in the left aspect of this frame is the north-western corner of the barn. The door above the staircase would have been used to ferry bales into and out of the barn’s loft. 

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This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof. 

Aerial Photo.jpg

Aerial photo of farm in the 1980s.

Location

52.787246, -112.269551                                             SW 16-44-16 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Fair

Construction Date: 1915 – 1920

Features: Single wooden cupola and hay hood, hay track, and hay carrier

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: No names or dates,

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement except in south-eastern corner where it is made of field stones

Shogren-Janzen

History

This barn was built by Andrew Shogren in 1915. The land was homestead by the Shogren family in 1906. Right away, in 1907, Andrew Shogren built the lean-to part of the barn (the southern shed on the main barn). The gambrel roofed part of the barn was not built until 1915. It is known that a barn dance took place inside the loft the newly built barn in 1915 (see “Additional History on the Property” for more).

Pete Janzen bought the quarter this barn sits on in 1945. The barn was not in very good condition at the time. Pete replaced the rotted foundation sills and braced the inside of the barn so it would not lean. In the mid 1970’s, the original cedar shingles were replaced with asphalt shingles and the barn was painted white. In 2002, the wooden foundation sills were again replaced. Don Janzen lifted the barn up to replace them and to pour a concrete foundation. At this time, a metal roof was also added to the barn.

Pete Janzen immigrated to Canada from Germany with his parents Edward and Anna Janzen in 1924. The family were what was known as “Black Sea Germans“. They had to flee their homeland North of the Black Sea after turmoil in the region claimed the lives of most of their family members. Heisler was a known German settlement at the time.

This barn has housed all types of livestock over the years. Andrew Shogren used it for milk cows, beef cattle, and horses. When Pete owned it, he had horses in the barn up until about 1994 and milk cows until about 2001. For a time, Pete even raised pigs and rabbits in the barn. Don Janzen began living on the property full-time in 1977. He kept beef cattle in the beginning but stopped keeping livestock in the late 1970’s. The barn has been used for storage ever since.

Janzen, Don. Personal communication. 29 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern half of the barn’s roof and the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face of the barn.

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This frame shows the western face and northern half of the barn’s roof.

IMG_0010

This frame is a close-up of the hay hood on the western face of the barn. Although a hay hood was built, this barn never had a hay carrier or hay track.

IMG_0013

This frame is of the northern half of the barn’s roof.

IMG_0017

This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and the eastern face of the barn.

IMG_0022

This frame shows the eastern face of the barn and the shed.

IMG_0026

This frame is a close-up of the door on the eastern face of the barn. Notice the teeth marks on the door. Remnants from when there used to be corrals and beef cattle surrounding the barn.

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This frame is a close-up of the eastern face of the shed addition.

IMG_0037

This frame shows the eastern face of the barn and the southern half of the barn’s roof.

barn 2

This frame shows the northern half of the barn’s roof and western face of the barn. This photo was taken in the mid 1970’s, when the barn was painted for the first time.

barn 3

This frame shows the western face of the barn. This photo was taken in the mid 1970’s. It was at this time that the barn was painted for the first time.

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This frame shows the barn in 2002. The sills of the barn rotted out and had to be replaced. Don Janzen lifted the barn and repaired its foundation. The corner in the background is the south-eastern corner of the main barn. The main wall in this picture was originally the outside of the shed on the barn.

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This frame shows the south-western corner of the main barn in 2002. When the barn was lifted, the stalls had to be removed.

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This frame shows the inside of the shed on the barn in 2002. The corner in the background of this frame is the south-western corner of the shed.

FARM 54.jpg

Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 1954.

FARM 80

Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 1980.

FARM 2003

Aerial photo of Janzen farm in 2003.

Location

52.490518, -111.894743                                        NW  36-40-14 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date: 1915

Features: Hay hood

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: White

Decorations: No names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

An Account on the Barn by Annie Gamroth Strachan

Excerpt from Peter Gamroth Family History.jpg

Strachan, Annie Gamroth. “Peter Gamroth Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of                       Galahad and District. 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Andrew Shogren Family History

andrew-shogren-family-history.jpg

Shogren, Effie. “Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Shogren”. Golden Echoes: A History of                              Galahad and District. 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Edward Janzen Family History

janzen-family-history-4.jpg

Janzen, Pete. “Edward Janzen Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of Galahad and District.           1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

Pete Janzen Family History

 

Janzen, Marce. “Pete Janzen Family”. Golden Echoes: A History of Galahad and District.                 1st ed. Galahad: Galahad Historical Society, 1980. Print.

 

Albrecht-Lehmann

History

This quarter section was homesteaded by Charles Albrecht. Charles married May Bovencamp and the two had three girls: Evelyn, Violet, and Geraldine. May Albrecht moved into the Killam Auxiliary Hospital in 1971 and the farm was sold.

Dusty and Twyla Lehmann moved to the property this barn stands on in 2013. They were both heavily involved in rodeo and circumstance brought them to the Flagstaff region. Immediately after arrival, Dusty and Twyla repaired and tinned the roof of the barn to protect the barn from water damage. That year, they also cleaned the barn and removed the mangers and some of the stalls on the main floor of the barn. The Lehmanns used the old wood from the barn to build a kitchen table for their home. In 2016, they ran electricity to Dusty’s shop and to the barn. They also built the tack room in the south-eastern corner of the barn. In late 2016, Dusty and Twyla repaired the frame for the southern door and replaced the southern door. In the spring of 2017, the Lehmanns built new corrals around the barn to house their horses and donkeys. In August of 2017 Dusty and Twyla were married in the barn.

Lehmann, Dusty and Twyla. Personal communication. 25 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn. The Lehmanns recently tinned the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn. Notice the distinctive gambrel shaped roof.

IMG_0017

This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn. The Lehmanns built many new corals and pens in 2017.

IMG_0021

This frame shows the southern face and eastern side of the barn.

IMG_0024

This frame shows the eastern side of the barn.

IMG_0027

This frame shows the eastern side and northern face of the barn.

IMG_0029

This frame shows the northern face of the barn. Like many other barns and farm buildings, water takes its toll on northern face of this barn.

IMG_0032

This frame shows the northern face and eastern side of the barn.

IMG_0044

This frame again shows the western side and southern face of the barn.

IMG_0047

This frame is a close-up of the barn’s hay hood. Notice the hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

IMG_0053

This frame shows the first stall in the south-western corner of the barn. Notice the cement floor throughout the barn.

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This frame shows the second and third stalls in the south-western corner of the barn. The boards that separated these two stalls were removed to create a larger storage area.

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This frame shows the final two stalls on the western side of the barn. The corner in the background of this frame is the north-western corner of the barn. The Lehmanns saved the wood from between thetwo stalls in the previous picture and are storing it here for later use. Dusty Lehmann is a skilled hand woodworker and plans to use the boards for furniture he is building.

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This frame shows the north-eastern corner stall. The mangers have been removed from all of the stalls.

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This frame shows the stalls on the eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the south-eastern stall area. These stalls were removed by the Lehmanns and then a tack room was built in their place.

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This frame shows the inside of the tack room. These saddle racks were built by Dusty Lehmann.

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This frame is a close-up of one of the saddle racks. The corner in the background of this frame is the north-western corner of the tack room.

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This frame shows another aspect of the tack room; the halter/harness racks.

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This frame shows the staircase to the barn’s loft. This door is located in the south-eastern corner of the barn.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the hay sling near the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the barn’s hay carrier and hay track.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the ventilation chute that used to connect to a single wooden cupola in the peak of the barn’s roof. This cupola had to be removed when the barn’s roof was tinned.

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The Lehmanns use the barn and their corrals for their horses and donkeys.

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Location

52.885633, -111.484954                                        NE -14-45-11 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Good

Construction Date:

Features: Hay hood, hay carrier, and hay track

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: Red with white trim

Decorations: White diagonal trim, no names or dates

Roof Covering: Metal

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Renovation Pictures

Lehmann Renos 1

In 2013, the Lehmanns repaired the barn’s roof. This work replaced the original cedar shingles with black tin.

Lehmann Renos 2

In 2016, the Lehmanns braced the southern door’s frame and installed a new sliding door.

Lehmann 1

On top of the work done on the barn, Dusty and Twyla have also repaired many of the farm’s outbuildings. One of the old garages in the yard was made into a work space for Dusty Lehmann’s hand woodworking.

Charles and May Albrecht Family History

albrecht-family-history.jpgAlbrecht, C. “Charles Albrecht Story”. Verdant Valleys In and Around Lougheed. 1st ed.                 Lougheed: Lougheed Women’s Institute, 1972. Print.

 

Borgel-Tindall

History

It is not known when this barn was constructed but it is known that it was moved to the property it now stands on in 1949. The barn was moved by Floyd Robinson at the request of the John and Laverne Borgel family. The Borgel family purchased this quarter of land from the White family. The barn was purchased from Nels Sorenson and moved from SW 02-44-13 W4. In order to get the barn to this property, the barn had to pass under a power line! Before the move, the barn did not have the western shed addition or the two wooden cupolas. These were both added by John Borgel in the early 1950’s.

The Borgel family originally used the barn for cow-calf pairs and their draft horses. However, in 1951 the family began milking cows and had the barn remodeled for that use. This meant that milking stanchions and a feed walk-way were added to the western side of the main barn.

In the fall of 1974, John and Laverne sold the property to Jim and Eldred Tindall. The pair had four children: Lyn Alice, Lyle, Shelaine, and Sheldon. The Tindall family changed many of the milking stalls and all of the horse stalls into box stalls for their beef cattle operation. The last time the barn was completely painted was in 1978/79. At this time, the phrase, “B&T RANCHES” was also painted on the southern face of the barn.

Sheldon and Donna Tindall were married in 1988 and both have lived on this property ever since. They raised their two children, Ashley and Jonathan, here.

Tindall, Sheldon and Donna. Personal communication. 22 Aug. 2017.

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This frame shows the southern face and western half of the barn’s roof. Notice the shed addition on the western side of the barn. This addition was installed after the barn was moved here.

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This frame shows the western half of the barn’s roof. Notice the wooden cupola chute in the first slope of the barn’s roof. Both cupolas were installed after the barn was moved.

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This frame shows the western side and northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the northern face and eastern side of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern side of the barn. Notice the paired windows.

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This frame shows the eastern side and southern face of the barn. Notice the hay hood and hay track in the peak of the barn’s roof.

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This frame shows the southern face of the barn. Notice the faded “RANCHES” phrase below the loft door. The face used to have the phrase “B&T RANCHES” painted on it.

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This frame shows the first stall and the walk-way into the shed addition on the western half of the barn.

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This frame shows all of the first stall on the south-western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the stall to the north of the previous frame. Notice the milking stanchions. All of the stalls on this side used to be milking stalls when the Borgel family owned the barn.

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This frame shows the penned area and staircase to the loft in the north-western corner of the barn. This large box stall was created by the Tindall family so that they could store their beef cattle inside the barn.

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This frame shows the bottom of the cupola’s ventilation chute. It is positioned in the middle of the barn on the western side. There is another one directly across from this one. The chutes were added by the Borgel family, after the barn was moved.

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This frame shows some of the wrought iron tack hooks on the western side of the barn.

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This frame shows the pathway through the main barn. The door in the background is the northern door of the main barn.

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This frame shows the eastern set of stalls. These were used by the Borgel family’s draft horses. The Tindall family changed these stalls into box stalls so that they could have their beef cattle inside the barn.

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This frame shows the inside of the barn’s loft. The face in the foreground is the southern face of the barn.

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This frame shows the eastern half of the barn’s roof. Notice the cupola’s ventilation chute. You can tell that the chutes were added after the fact because they are made of different wood than what was used in the rest of the barn.

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This frame shows the trusses which create the barn’s gambrel roof shape.

moved-barn-1949-sedgewick-book-778.jpg

“Farm Buildings”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding                          Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982, pg. 778. Print.

Aerial Photo 1954

Aerial photo circa 1954. Notice how the shed addition and cupolas are installed 5 years after the move of the barn.

Aerial Photo 1976

Aerial photo circa 1976.

Location

52.787265, -111.751915                                       SE 13-44-13 W4

Characteristics

Barn Condition: Fair

Construction Date: Unknown

Features: Two cupola chutes

Roof Shape: Gambrel

Paint: White

Decorations: Used to have, “B&T RANCHES” painted on the southern face

Roof Covering: Metal and cedar shingles

Siding: Wooden drop siding

Foundation: Cement

Additional History on the Property

Land Title Search from the Glenbow Museum

The following information about this quarter of land can be found in the Glenbow Museum’s Archives of CPR Land Sales at this link.

Land Title

Jim and Eldred Tindall Family History

Tindal Family History 1 - Sedgewick.jpg

“Jim and Eldred Tindall”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding                      Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical Society, 1982. Print.

John and Laverne Borgel Family History

For the following histories, the first two images are from Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of Sedgewick and Surrounding Districts while the second two images are from The Pleasant Country: Volume I, Killam and District 1903-1993.

Arntzen, Carol (Borgel). “The John Borgel Family”. Sedgewick Sentinel: A History of                      Sedgewick and Surrounding Districts. 1st Ed. Sedgewick: Sedgewick Historical                    Society, 1982. Print.

The Family. “John and Laverne Borgel Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume I Killam                and District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.

Nels and Ida Sorenson Family History

Sorenson Family History 1 - Killam.jpg

“Nels and Ida Minnie Sorenson Family”. The Pleasant Country: Volume II Killam and                      District 1903-1993. 1st ed. Killam: Killam Historical Society, 1993. Print.